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Jamboards

A good talk contains no proofs; a great talk contains no theorems.

- Victor Klee

Office Hour Jamboard

This same blank jamboard is used during all office hours so you have the option to also interact with it.

Math 10 Jamboards

Numbers

Place Value

Naming place value for counting numbers: Sort the counting numbers by their largest place value.

Naming place value for decimal numbers: Sort the decimals by their smallest place value.

Ordering counting numbers: Order counting numbers by sliding the rectangle to expose digits from left to right. (Can differently written counting numbers be equal?)

Ordering decimals: Order decimals by sliding the rectangle to expose digits from left to right. (Can differently written decimals be equal?)

Ordering integers: Change the jamboard about ordering counting numbers so it works for a collection of negative integers. (Can you also design a jamboard that helps you order a mix of positive and negative integers?)

Decimal point scoots in multiplication: ??

Decimal point scoots in division: ??

Factors

Factors as rectangles: Show how all the factors of a number can be represented using rectangles.

Factors as piles: Show how all the factors of a number can be represented using piles.

Odd and Even: Use either rectangles or piles to test which numbers are even. (The numbers that fail the test are odd.)

They aren't primes: Use either rectangles or piles to find which numbers are not prime. (These are called composite. Why is this task not a reliable test, as it was for odd and even?)

They are primes: Use the sieve trick to show which numbers are prime.

Factor trees: Move factors around to make trees. Are all factors used? Do all arrangements eventually make the same "leaves" on the tree?

Multiples

Multiples as rectangles: Show how the multiples of a number can be represented using rectangles.

Multiples as piles: Show how the multiples of a number can be represented using piles.

Algorithms

Addition algorthm: Build the addition problem with blocks/rows/cubes twice, once to leave it looking nice and a second time to show how the carrying works.

Subtraction algorthm: Build the subtraction problem with blocks/rows/cubes twice, once to leave it looking nice and a second time to show how the borrowing works.

Multiplication algorthm: Translate the multiplication problem into rectangle format and find the answer. Then also build it with blocks/rows/cubes twice, once to leave it looking nice and a second time to show how the scooting works.

Division algorthm: First, translate the division problem into dealing out cards. Second, translate the division problem into making a rectangle. Third, translate it into making piles of fixed size. (How are these three versions similar or different?)

Addition perimeter puzzle: Not every side of these polygons is labeled. Can we still find the perimter?

Multiplication area puzzle: Not every side of these polygons is labeled. Can we still find the area?

Decimal addition and subtraction algorthm: What happens when we forget to line up the decimal point? Before we add or subtract, can we predict what the answer's largest and smallest place value will be?

Decimal multiplication and division algorthm: Match the prologue scoots to the problems. Before we multiply or divide, can we predict what the answer's largest and smallest place value will be?

Addition perimeter puzzle with decimals: Not every side of these polygons is labeled. Can we still find the perimter?

Multiplication area puzzle with decimals: Not every side of these polygons is labeled. Can we still find the area?

Fractions

Expressions

Term independence: Arrange the terms into an expression. Solve the expression. Compare your result with a group that arranged the terms in a different order before solving.

Finishing PEMDAS: Match the expressions with parenthesis with the equivalent expressions with fraction bars.